Latest EC draft Guide on 2004/108/EC EMC Directive, 2nd edition.

New (April 2007)

2004/108/EC: Compliance for Fixed Installations, custom equipment/systems intended for fixed installations, and M&E Contractors
(PDF format, 233kB)

New (April 2010)

The new EMC Directive 2004/108/EC came into force throughout the UK and Europe in July 2007, and for the first time included specific legal requirements for fixed installations, system integrators and custom engineers, including EMC documentation.

Although electrical installers and M&E contractors have no legal obligations under this Directive, they will probably find that most of their customers (who do have legal obligations) will expect them to employ good modern EMC engineering practices and provide them with the necessary compliance documentation.

The new EMC Directive 2004-108-EC 2004-108 and Fixed Installations, EMCJ, Issue 66, Dec 2006
EMC compliance without 3rd party testing, InCompliance mag, Nov 2014
EMC Directive for Conformity 2009 Annual Guide, 24 Jan 09
‘Self-Certification’ to the EMC Directive
(Word format, 380K)
A discussion of what is meant by "self certification" (Article 10.1 of the EMC Directive 89/336/EEC) and how to go about it.
Checklist for information to be included in a Technical Construction File (TCF)
(Word format, 55K)
A table of the mandatory and other information that should form part of a "Technical Contruction File" (Article 10.2 of the EMC Directive 89/336/EEC). A useful checklist for Competent Bodies as well as manufacturers. Always work with your Competent Body from an early part in a project, to help avoid disappointment later.
Four examples of Declarations of Conformity
(Word format, 57K)

Four examples of Declarations of Conformity:
1) EMC (Self-certification) + LVD;
2) EMC (TCF) + LVD
3) EMC (Self-certification) + LVD + Machinery Directive
4 ) EMC (TCF) + LVD + Machinery Directive

CE + CE does not equal CE, what to do instead
(Word format, 474K)

Simply combining CE marked items of equipment cannot ensure EMC compliance for the finished product, system or installation.
Four articles published in the EMC & Compliance Journal …. a) Adding up Emissions: a method of predicting emissions based on the emissions from the individual units
b) Electronic BSE (Mad Cow disease)
c) Informing the Customer
d) 'Procedural' TCFs
QA Procedures for EMC Compliance
Compliance Engineering magazine

Quality assurance procedures for EMC Compliance in serial manufacture

Search the Compliance Engineering website for "Armstrong”.

Achieve compliance using a spreadsheet
Conformity magazine

A method of predicting emissions based on the emissions from the individual units, using a spreadsheet.

Search the Conformity magazine website for "Armstrong”.

   

EMC for Systems and Installations
Tim Williams and Keith Armstrong
Newnes, 2000, ISBN 0 7506 4167 3, Paperback, cost around £34
Buy on-line at www.newnespress.com or from RS Components (Part No. 377-6463)

This is a guide for systems designers and installers faced with achieving EMC (electromagnetic compatibility). It is valuable across a wide range of roles and sectors, including process control, manufacturing, medical, IT and building management. The EMC issues covered will also make this book essential reading for product manufacturers and suppliers – and highly relevant for managers as well as technical staff.
The authors’ approach is thoroughly practical – all areas of installation EMC are covered with particular emphasis on cabling and earthing. Students on MSc and CPD programmes will also find in this book some valuable real-world antidotes to the academic treatises.

The Benefits of Applying
IEC 61000-5-2 to Cable Shield Bonding and Earthing

(Word format, 406K)

Traditional practice is to bond cable shields (screens) to the earth (ground) at one end only, using a length or wire. This brief article says why this is very bad for EMC, and explains how the IEC 61000-5-2 mesh-bonding approach works so well.
EMC for Systems and Installations Series A series of six articles, published 2000
CE + CE does not equal CE, what to do instead
(Word format, 474K)
Simply combining CE marked items of equipment cannot ensure EMC compliance for the finished product, system or installation.